Posts Tagged With: Kindergarten

Dear Otto: How do I teach Google Drive to K/1?

tech questions

Do you have a tech question?

Dear Otto is an occasional column where I answer questions I get from readers about teaching tech. If you have a question, please complete the form below and I’ll answer it here. For your privacy, I use only first names.

Here’s a great question I got from Lois:

I’ve been teaching computer technology for 6 years now. The first four years, we worked with Microsoft Office – Word; Powerpoint; Excel. The last two years, we went to an Apple platform and now we use iWorks Suite: Pages; Keynote and Numbers. So far so good – but I feel like I have to “double teach” some things: use this for Word (at home) and this for Pages (at school). Students have not been able to work on projects at home because of the compatibility issue. Not much of an issue for my little ones – we don’t send home much homework – but I would love for them to take these skills and run with them while at home. I teach from the menu and do not introduce shortcuts so they are forced to learn the “mechanics” of a program. Now I’m being asked to use Google docs next year. I’m on the fence when it comes to google docs for several reasons: It requires a username and password and email (which we don’t introduce until middle school) so my young students will now spend more time just “logging in”. I’ve heard there are ways to have the “email” go to the teacher – but I’m not sure how this works. The other issue is that I feel like Google Docs is “restrictive” when it comes to formatting.

..
Over the years, I have taught file management and how to save documents to file folders with correct titles. Students learn how to take ownership of their work. Google Docs automatically saves work in a cloud. I’m wondering if they will work on google docs at school (and have their work saved automatically – a good thing) and then work on Word or Pages at home and forget to save (a bad thing).

..
While I review the ISTE standards, I have not come across cloud computing and I wonder if I would be negligent if I didn’t teach students how to properly save their work, or use a particular type of software that is prevalent in higher education and the workforce. Am I behind the times? I feel like I’m going from one issue to another. Should kindergarteners and first graders have email accounts (and the issues that come with that responsibility) but be capable using the cloud, or should I continue to focus on core software and file management?
I’m dancing as fast as I can…..

..
Thoughts???? 

Hi Lois

Great questions. Tech changes so rapidly, unlike most other core subjects. It’s quite a challenge for us to keep up. I sometimes wonder if Admin considers the repercussions and implementation needs of their latest ‘great’ idea.

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Categories: Ask Otto, classroom management, critical thinking, K-5 Tech training | Tags: , , , , | 11 Comments

Book Review: Kindergarten Technology Textbook

kindergartenKindergarten Technology: 32 Lessons Every Kindergartner Can Accomplish on a Computer

by Structured Learning IT Teaching Team

I’m often asked what books I recommend for teaching technology in the classroom. Each year about this time, I do a series of reviews on my favorite tech ed books. If you want to fix some of last year’s problems, I suggest you consider the nine-volume K-8 technology curriculum series that’s used in hundreds of school districts across the country (and a few internationally). It’s skills-based, project-based, aligned with Common Core and NETS national standards and fully integratable into state core classroom standards.

The first in the series, the 132-page Kindergarten Technology: 32 Lessons Any Kindergartner Can Do (Structured Learning 2013), is available in print or digital, and perfect for Smartscreens, iPads, laptops, digital readers. It includes many age-appropriate samples, reproducibles, Web 2.0 connections, thematic websites, and how-to’s. Because I edited this book, I made sure it includes pieces that I as a teacher knew to be critical to the classroom:

Continue reading

Categories: Book review, Book reviews, classroom management, homeschool, Kindergarten, teacher resources, Tech ed, Web 2.0 | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Book Review: 55 Tech Projects for the Digital Classroom

LESSON PLANSWith the school year on its way back, I want to share some of the tech books I use in my classroom. I think you’ll enjoy them also. This one is a two-volume all-in-one for grades K-8. It includes a mixture of lessons that cover different skills, different subjects. Hope you like it!

55 Technology Projects for the Digital Classroom: Everything you need to integrate computers into K-8 classes

by Jacqui Murray

Volume I is 219 pages and Volume II 235 pages, making this series an all-in-one K-8 toolkit for the lab specialist, classroom teacher and homeschooler, with a years-worth of simple-to-follow projects for K-8. Integrate technology into language arts, geography, history, problem solving, research skills, and science lesson plans and units of inquiry using teacher resources that meet NETS-S national guidelines and many state standards. The fifty-five projects are categorized by subject, program (software), and skill (grade) level. Each project includes standards met in three areas (higher-order thinking, technology-specific, and NETS-S), software required, time involved, suggested experience level, subject area supported, tech jargon, step-by-step lessons, extensions for deeper exploration, troubleshooting tips and project examples including reproducibles. Tech programs used are KidPix, all MS productivity software, Google Earth, typing software and online sites, email, Web 2.0 tools (blogs, wikis, internet start pages, social bookmarking and photo storage), Photoshop and Celestia. Also included is an Appendix of over 200 age-appropriate child-friendly websites. Skills taught include collaboration, communication, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, creativity, digital citizenship, information fluency, presentation, and technology concepts. In short, it’s everything you’d need to successfully integrate technology into the twenty-first century classroom.

Included are links to free versions of software so users aren’t forced to purchase expensive software and many how-to’s on timely technology topics like when to start keyboarding, how to integrate Web 2.0 tools into classrooms and more. The ebook is also connected to this Ask a Tech Teacher blog so users can stay up-to-date on tech in their classes and can get immediate assistance with lessons should they get stuck.

Disclaimer: I am the author of this two-volume series.

DIGITAL DELIVERY


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing TeachersCisco guest blogger, a columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer. Contact Jacqui at her writing office or her tech lab, Ask a Tech Teacher.

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Categories: Book reviews, K-5 Tech training, lesson plans, teacher resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

169 Kindergarten Websites That Tie into Classroom Inquiry

kindergarten websitesThese are my 120 favorite kindergarten websites. I sprinkle them in throughout the year, adding several each week to the class internet start page, deleting others. I make sure I have 3-4 each week that integrate with classroom inquiry, 3-4 that deal with technology skills and a few that simply excite students about tech.

Here’s the list:

  1. Aesop Fables
  2. Aesop Fables—no ads
  3. Alphabet Animals
  4. Alphabet Doors
  5. Animal Games
  6. Animal Games II
  7. Animal Homes II
  8. Audio stories
  9. Barnaby and Bellinda Bear
  10. Bembo’s Zoo
  11. Build a car
  12. Build a car–abcya
  13. Build a Neighborhood
  14. Car puzzle
  15. Clock games–many
  16. Clocks
  17. Clocks—set the time–BBC
  18. Color US Symbols
  19. Counting Money
  20. Create Music
  21. Dino collection
  22. Dino Fossils then and now
  23. Dino Games
  24. Dino Games II
  25. Dinosaurs
  26. Dinosaurs II
  27. Dinosaurs IV
  28. Dinosaurs V
  29. Dinosaurs VI
  30. Dr. Seuss
  31. Edugames at Pauly’s Playhouse
  32. Edugames—drag-and-drop puzzles
  33. Endangered species collection
  34. Fables–beautiful
  35. Find a dog
  36. Game Goo—wacky games that teach
  37. Games to teach mouse skills, problem-solving
  38. Games to teach problem-solving skills
  39. Geogreeting—find letters around the world
  40. Great Websites—can’t get thru all of them
  41. Groundhog Day
  42. Holiday Elf Games
  43. Holiday music
  44. Holiday—Design Gingerbread House
  45. Holiday—match game
  46. Holiday—North Pole Academy
  47. Holidays–various
  48. Interactive sites
  49. Kerpoof
  50. Keyboarding—Hyper Spider Typing
  51. Kindergarten Links—Science, etc.
  52. KinderSite—lots of kindergarten websites
  53. Learn to Read
  54. Learn to read—Teach your monster to read
  55. Letters—find the letter
  56. Letters—find the letter—caps and lower case
  57. Letters—sort by sounds
  58. Literacy sites
  59. Magic Keys–stories for youngers
  60. Make a Face
  61. Make a Monster
  62. Make a Scary Spud
  63. Make a Story
  64. Math for K
  65. Math Games
  66. Math/LA Videos by grade level
  67. Mighty book storybooks
  68. Mr. Picasso Head
  69. Museum of Modern Art
  70. Music—Quincy and the Magic Instruments
  71. Ocean Currents—video from NASA
  72. Ocean Safari
  73. Ocean Tracks
  74. PBS Stories–Between the Lions
  75. Puzzle
  76. Reading games
  77. Recycle—Michael Michael Go Recycle
  78. Shapes and colors
  79. Sid the Scientist
  80. Signed stories
  81. Spring Garden—click for flowers
  82. Starfall 
  83. Stories–Animated
  84. Stories—CircleTime—international
  85. Stories—MeeGenius—read/to me
  86. Stories—non-text
  87. The Learning Planet
  88. Time
  89. Time clocks
  90. Transportation alphabet
  91. Transportation games
  92. Transportation matching
  93. Transportation Sequence Games
  94. Transportation video–BrainPopJr
  95. Turkey websites
  96. Valentine Sudoku
  97. Valentine mouse skills
  98. Line up the hearts
  99. Dress up the heart
  100. Valentine unscramble
  101. Valentine typing
  102. Valentine puppy jigsaw
  103. Valentine drag-and-drop
  104. Valentine match
  105. Valentine tic-tac-toe
  106. Valentine projects from Winter Wonderland
  107. Write in a heart
  108. More heart writing
  109. ‘I love you’ in languages Afrikaans to Zulu
  110. Valentine’s Day apps
  111. Valentine Day games and stories
  112. Valentine coloring book
  113. Valentine Day poem generator
  114. Valentine rebuses
  115. Valentine rebus game
  116. Virtual Farm
  117. Virtual Zoo
  118. Word games—k-2
  119. Writing games
  120. Ziggity Zoom Stories

Technology

  1. Audio books—Ms. Noor–free
  2. Bees and Honey
  3. Clicky’s Web(safe) World
  4. Clicky’s Web(safe) World II
  5. Computer basics
  6. Computer Basics II
  7. Computer puzzle
  8. Computer safety
  9. Cyber-bullying video
  10. Day in a digital citizen’s life
  11. Disney CyberNetiquette Comix
  12. Drag and drop games–visual
  13. Drag and drop puzzles
  14. Drag and drop skills
  15. Find the Technology
  16. Garfield internet safety
  17. Internet—what is it–video
  18. Internet safety games
  19. Internet Safety Site –Disney
  20. Internet Smart Princess
  21. Jigsaw puzzles
  22. Jigzone–puzzles
  23. Keyboard Climber
  24. Keyboard Use Video
  25. Listen/read–Free non-fic audio books
  26. Monitor Use Video
  27. More Mouse Skills
  28. Mouse and tech basics–video
  29. Mouse Click Skills—gorgeous
  30. Mouse exercises–for olders too
  31. Mouse practice
  32. Mouse practice—drag, click
  33. Mouse Song
  34. Mouse Use Video
  35. Mouse—Tidy the Classroom
  36. Mouse—Wack a Gopher
  37. Mousing around
  38. My Online Neighborhood–video
  39. NetSmartKids–read-to-you–net safety
  40. Odiogo—read blog posts to students
  41. Organize technology (drag and drop)
  42. Parts of the computer
  43. Parts of the computer—BrainPopJr
  44. Princess who knew how to UYN–video
  45. Surf Swell Island
  46. Tech Training—basics
  47. Tidy the classroom
  48. Videos on Computer Basics K-6
  49. Webville Outlaws–internet safety

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Categories: first grade, free tech resources, Subjects, websites | Tags: , , , | 9 Comments

Weekend Website #125: Starfall Math

Every week, I share a website that inspired my students. Here’s one you may have missed. Starfall is a lot more than reading…

startfall more

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Categories: first grade, Kindergarten, Parent resources, second grade, websites | Tags: , , , | 7 Comments

How to Teach Digital Citizenship in Kindergarten

digital citizenship

How can I teach my students about digital citizenship

Understanding how to use the internet has become a cornerstone issue for students. No longer do they complete their research on projects solely in the library. Now, there is a vasy landscape of resources available on the internet.

But with wealth comes responsibility. As soon as children begin to visit the online world, they need the knowledge to do that safely, securely, responsibly. There are several great programs available to guide students through this process (Common Sense’s Digital Passport, Carnegie CyberAcademy, Netsmart Kids). I’ve collected them as resources and developed a path to follow that includes the best of everything.

Here’s Kindergarten:

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Categories: Kindergarten, lesson plans, websites | Tags: , , , | 14 Comments

Back to School–Tech Makes it Easy to Stay On Top of Everything

back to school

Tech for back to school

If you’re sending your child back to school, technology can be intimidating. Should your elementary-age child have a computer? If so, what should you buy? And how do you keep it safe?

Here’s what I tell my K-5 parents about how to handle the stress of equipping the 21st century tech kid:

By third grade, children need a computer. Here’s why:

  • There’s a good chance your child’s class has a website. All of my school’s classes from kindergarten up do. On those webpages, teachers list what happened during class, homework, resources, extensions, expectations and more. You’ll want to access those to stay up to date.
  • It’s hard for you as a parent to keep in touch with all the ancillary teachers your child sees during the day AS WELL AS  the classroom teacher. I’m talking about the art teacher, the PE teacher, language B teacher, technology teacher. A good way is to access their school webpages. My profile at school links to my class technology page. All of our Specials (the teachers who cover subjects outside of the classroom) have their own webpages. This is likely true in your school, too.
  • A lot of teachers choose to communicate with parents via blogs or twitter. Here’s my professional blog. It’s a great way to casually keep parents and students up to date on class activities. I have one at school, too, but non-students are locked out of it.
  • Much classwork integrates information from the internet. If your child is excited about something shown in class, s/he’ll want to revisit at home. That’s as simple as an internet connection and the website (probably posted on the class webpage). In tech class, students have a class internet start page and a class wiki (I’ve linked to my fifth grade wiki) that track everything done in class for follow-up at home. All are accessible from one location on my class webpage to make it easier on parents and students. Continue reading
Categories: classroom management, opinion, Parent resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Book Review: 55 Tech Projects for the Digital Classroom

55 Technology Projects for the Digital Classroom: Everything you need to integrate computers into K-8 classesWith the school year almost back, I want to share some of the tech books I use in my classroom. I think you’ll enjoy them also. This one is a two-volume all-in-one for grades K-8. It includes a mixture of lessons that cover different skills, different subjects. Hope you like it!

55 Technology Projects for the Digital Classroom: Everything you need to integrate computers into K-8 classes

by Jacqui Murray

Volume I is 219 pages and Volume II 235 pages, making this series an all-in-one K-8 toolkit for the lab specialist, classroom teacher and homeschooler, with a years-worth of simple-to-follow projects for K-8. Integrate technology into language arts, geography, history, problem solving, research skills, and science lesson plans and units of inquiry using teacher resources that meet NETS-S national guidelines and many state standards. The fifty-five projects are categorized by subject, program (software), and skill (grade) level. Each project includes standards met in three areas (higher-order thinking, technology-specific, and NETS-S), software required, time involved, suggested experience level, subject area supported, tech jargon, step-by-step lessons, extensions for deeper exploration, troubleshooting tips and project examples including reproducibles. Tech programs used are KidPix, all MS productivity software, Google Earth, typing software and online sites, email, Web 2.0 tools (blogs, wikis, internet start pages, social bookmarking and photo storage), Photoshop and Celestia. Also included is an Appendix of over 200 age-appropriate child-friendly websites. Skills taught include collaboration, communication, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, creativity, digital citizenship, information fluency, presentation, and technology concepts. In short, it’s everything you’d need to successfully integrate technology into the twenty-first century classroom.

If you send a proof of purchase for the print textbook to the publisher at sales@structuredlearning.net, you can buy a discounted pdf of the book here. Continue reading

Categories: Book reviews, K-5 Tech training, lesson plans, teacher resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Book Review: Kindergarten Technology Textbook

kindergarten technologyKindergarten Technology: 32 Lessons Every Kindergartner Can Accomplish on a Computer

by Structured Learning IT Teaching Team

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’m often asked what books I’d recommend for teaching technology in the classroom. Each year about this time, I do a series of reviews on my favorite tech ed books. If you’re already looking ahead to next year’s technology curriculum and want to fix some of this year’s problems, I suggest you consider the seven-volume K-6 technology curriculum series that’s used in hundreds of school districts across the country (and a few internationally). It’s skills-based, project-based, aligned with NETS national standards and fully integratable into state core classroom standards.

The first in the series, the 58-page Kindergarten Technology: 32 Lesson Any Kindergartner Can Do, is the Fourth Edition (Structured Learning 2011), updated to MS Office 2007/10, available in print or digital, and perfect for Smartscreens, iPads, laptops. It  includes many  age-appropriate samples, reproducibles, Web 2.0 connections, thematic websites, and how-to’s. Because I edited this book, I made sure it includes pieces that I as a teacher knew to be critical to teachers:

  • PDF version is in full color
  • PDF version has active links so you can click through to enrichments when required for student-centered learning
  • each lesson summarizes a 45-minute class period–usually 2-3 activities, arranged temporally throughout the year for ease of understanding by students. For example, a lesson is likely to include 2-3 activities from among typing practice, student presentations, project that ties into core class activity, problem-solving that assists with 1:1 initiatives
  • each lesson is aligned with NETS standards
  • each lesson includes required vocabulary
  • each lesson provides integrations to core classroom units and topics
  • each lesson includes trouble-shooting solutions to the problems most likely to come up in the classroom
  • each lesson includes enrichments for those precocious students who finish the lesson and want more
  • includes a list of websites (PDF has active links, print version goes to Ask a Tech Teacher Great Websites). Both print and PDF can access a webpage on Ask a Tech Teacher that is updated yearly with new websites by grade level and category
  • there’s a help link (to this blog) to a teacher using the curriculum will help you through the prickly parts of a lesson plan. This is FREE–no charge.
  • Where lessons center around purchased software, the authors made an effort to offer free alternatives. For example, instead of KidPix, teachers can use TuxPaint. Instead of Type to Learn, teachers can use a list of online keyboarding websites like Dance Mat Typing and Typing Web
  • If you buy the print book, the PDF is discounted
  • includes pedagogy articles to help think through critical issues like keyboarding, use of the internet, how to use wikis in classrooms, and more

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Categories: Book review, Book reviews, classroom management, homeschool, Kindergarten, teacher resources, Tech ed, Web 2.0 | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

62 Kindergarten Websites That Tie into Classroom Lessons

These are my 62 favorite kindergarten websites. I sprinkle them in throughout the year, adding several each week to the class internet start page, deleting others. I make sure I have 3-4

each week that integrate with classroom lesson plans, 3-4 that deal with technology skills and a few that simply excite students about tech.

Here’s the list:

  1. Aesop Fables
  2. Aesop Fables—no ads
  3. Alphabet—Kerpoof Letters
  4. Alphabet Animals
  5. Alphabet Doors
  6. Audio stories
  7. Barnaby and Bellinda Bear
  8. Bembo’s Zoo
  9. Brown Bear Typing
  10. Build a Neighborhood
  11. Color US Symbols
  12. Counting Money
  13. Clocks
  14. Clock Talk
  15. Create Music
  16. Dinosaurs
  17. Dinosaurs II
  18. Dinosaurs III
  19. Dinosaurs IV
  20. Dinosaurs V
  21. Dinosaurs VI
  22. Dinosaur VII
  23. Dino Fossiles then and now
  24. Dr. Seuss
  25. Edugames at Pauly’s Playhouse
  26. Edugames—drag-and-drop puzzles
  27. Fairy Tales and Fables
  28. Find a dog
  29. Game Goo—wacky games that teach
  30. Games to teach mouse skills, problem-solving
  31. Games to teach problem-solving skills
  32. Geogreeting—find letters around the world
  33. Holiday Gingerbread house
  34. Interactive sites
  35. Kerpoof
  36. Kid’s Videos
  37. Keyboarding—Hyper Spider Typing
  38. Kindergarten Links—Science, etc.
  39. Kindergartend Math Links
  40. Kinder Stories
  41. Learn to Read
  42. Make a Face
  43. Make a Monster
  44. Make a Scary Spud
  45. Make a Story
  46. Math for K
  47. Math/LA Videos by grade level
  48. Math Games
  49. Mightybook Stories–visual
  50. Mr. Picasso Head
  51. Museum of Modern Art
  52. My Online Neighborhood
  53. Puzzle
  54. Shapes and colors
  55. Starfall
  56. Stories—non-text
  57. Storytime for Me
  58. The Learning Planet
  59. Time
  60. Virtual Farm
  61. Virtual Zoo
  62. Word games—k-2

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Categories: first grade, free tech resources, Subjects, websites | Tags: , , , | 24 Comments

What Should You Expect of Younger Keyboarders?

Please check out my guest post for BAM! Radio, What Should You Expect of Younger Keyboarders, a continuation of our on-radio discussion about younger keyboarders. I take the sometimes controversial stand that youngers can keyboard if it’s taught in an age-appropriate and developmentally-healthy manner.

Here’s a teaser:

Before I answer that question, let’s back up a step and answer a more fundamental question: Should you expect youngers to keyboard? I’m talking about students between kindergarten and fifth grade. Are they mature enough? Do they have the fine motor skills required to use the pinkie to push the A key? Do they have that kind of focus and concentration? Should they be playing outside rather than typing at a computer?

The answer is: Yes, as a rule, though when I reviewed the literature on this subject, it is all over the place as far as when students should begin. Some say third grade; some say not until fifth or sixth. From my experience, it’s third grade, though I teach pre-keyboard skills as young as kindergarten. That might be why my students are ready in third grade.

Here’s a caveat: You’ll have to be the arbiter as to whether this is true for your group. If you determine your students aren’t ready, wait a year. You’re the teacher. You’ll know when they’re ready.

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Categories: first grade, Keyboarding, Kindergarten, opinion, second grade | Tags: , | 2 Comments

I Love my Kindergarten Class Wiki

This is the first in my series of classroom management via wikis, to get us-all ready for school. Here are links for grades 1-5 wiki pages:

This one is Kindergarten:

classroom wikis

Click here to visit my kindergarten class wiki

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Categories: classroom management, Kindergarten, teacher resources, websites, Wikis | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Back to School–Tech Makes it Easy to Stay On Top of Everything

If you’re sending your child back to school, technology can be intimidating. Should your elementary-age child have a computer? If so, what should you buy? And how do you keep it safe?

Here’s what I tell my K-5 parents about how to handle the stress of equipping the 21st century tech kid:

By third grade, children need a computer. Here’s why:

  • There’s a good chance your child’s class has a website. All of my school’s classes from kindergarten up do. On those webpages, teachers list what happened during class, homework, resources, extensions, expectations and more. You’ll want to access those to stay up to date.
  • It’s hard for you as a parent to keep in touch with all the ancillary teachers your child sees during the day AS WELL AS  the classroom teacher. I’m talking about the art teacher, the PE teacher, language B teacher, technology teacher. A good way is to access their school webpages. Here’s my profile, which, if you were a parent, would link to my class technology page. All of our Specials (the teachers who cover subjects outside of the classroom) have their own webpages. This is likely true in your school, too.
  • A lot of teachers choose to communicate with parents via blogs or twitter. Here’s my blog. It’s a great way to casually keep parents and students up to date on class activities. I haven’t re-started mine for the new school year, so don’t expect much today. Check back in a month!
  • Much classwork integrates information from the internet. If your child is excited about something shown in class, s/he’ll want to revisit at home. That’s as simple as an internet connection and the website (probably posted on the class webpage). In tech class, students have a class internet start page and a class wiki (I’ve linked to my fifth grade wiki) that track everything done in class for follow-up at home. All are accessible from one location on my class webpage to make it easier on parents and students. Continue reading
Categories: classroom management, opinion, Parent resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Book Review: Kindergarten Technology–32 Lessons

Kindergarten Technology: 32 Lessons Every Kindergartner Can Accomplish on a ComputerKindergarten Technology: 32 Lessons Every Kindergartner Can Accomplish on a Computer

by Structured Learning IT Teaching Team

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is the Fourth Edition, updated to MS Office 2007/10. It  includes many more samples, reproducibles, Web 2.0 connections and how-to’s that are age-appropriate for a second grader. At 58 pages, it’s much more like a tech lab-in-a-binder than a mere 32 projects. The Amazon blurb says it all:

The six-volume Structured Learning Technology Curriculum (Fourth Edition, 2011) is the all-in-one solution to running an effective, efficient, and fun technology program  whether you’re the lab specialist, IT coordinator, classroom teacher, or homeschooler, and is the current choice of hundreds of school districts across the country. Newly updated and expanded, each volume now includes step-by-step directions for a year’s worth of projects, samples, grading rubrics, reproducibles, wall posters, teaching ideas and hundreds of online connections to access enrichment material and updates from a working technology lab. Aligned with ISTE national technology standards, the curriculum follows a tested timeline of which skill to introduce when, starting with mouse skills, keyboarding, computer basics, and internet/Web 2.0 tools in Kindergarten/First; MS Word, Publisher, Excel, PowerPoint, Google Earth, internet research, email and Photoshop in Second-Fifth. Each activity is integrated with classroom units in history, science, math, literature, reading, writing, critical thinking and more. Whether you’re an experienced tech teacher or brand new to the job, you’ll appreciate the hundreds of embedded links that enable you to stay on top of current technology thinking and get help from active technology teachers using the program. Additional items included in each volume are wall posters to explain basic concepts, suggestions for keyboarding standards, discussion of how to integrate Web 2.0 tools into the classroom curriculum and the dozens of online websites to support classroom subjects.

For a limited time, if you send a proof of purchase for the print textbook to the publisher at sales@structuredlearning.net, you can buy a discounted pdf of the book. Continue reading

Categories: Book review, Book reviews, classroom management, homeschool, Kindergarten, teacher resources, Tech ed, Web 2.0 | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

Weekend Websites #79: 57 Kindergarten Websites That Tie into Classroom Lessons

Every Friday I’ll send you a wonderful website that my classes and my parents love. I think you’ll find they’ll be a favorite of your students as they are of mine.

kindergarten websites

Here's my internet start page for kindergarten--you'll see the websites we focused on at the end of this school year

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Categories: classroom management, Kindergarten, Parent resources, Subjects, teacher resources, websites | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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