Posts Tagged With: lists

Did you Miss These in April?

Here are the most-read posts for the month of April:

  1. Why College Matters for a Successful Career in Tech
  2. 15 Websites to Teach Financial Literacy
  3. #CoronaVirus–This Week’s Inbox
  4. Stem Education in 2020
  5. How to Assess Digital Literacy
  6. Teaching During #CoronaVirus–An Old Strategy That’s Perfect
  7. Teaching During COVID-19
  8. Why Earth Day May be the Most Important Event at School
  9. 10 Tips for Teaching Remotely
  10. 3 Apps That Energize Learning
  11. End of Year Activities
  12. The Challenge of Connecting in the Age of COVID

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Categories: blogging, news | Tags: | Leave a comment

13 Holiday Websites and 9 Projects

Need a few websites to fill in free minutes? Here are Holiday websites that will keep students busy while teaching them:

  1. 12 Days of Christmas
  2. Christmas puzzles and games
  3. Christmas—history—fun video
  4. Holiday Crossword
  5. Holiday Elf Games
  6. Holiday Hangman II
  7. Holiday music II–sing along with the music–the site provides the words
  8. Holiday—find the word
  9. Holiday—Math Facts
  10. Holiday—North Pole Academy
  11. Holidays around the world
  12. Phone call from Santa
  13. Santa Tracker

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Categories: holidays, websites | Tags:

Snow Day? 7 Ways to Keep Teaching

To meet state and national requirements (and receive critical funding), schools must be open a minimum number of days each year. When dramatic weather hits — be it snow or violent storms or another emergency — it becomes impossible to reach the classroom. That means lesson plans aren’t completed, assessments aren’t taken, and kids don’t learn. There used to be no alternative but more and more, schools are using technology to keep the learning going. For example, Wabash County issues all students MacBook Airs and iPads (your school could use Chromebooks) that are available to students who can’t get to school:

All Wabash County students in grades 3 through 12 have a MacBook Air they take home every day. For snow days, K2 students can bring home the iPads they use at school. 

Pascack Valley Regional High School District in northern New Jersey makes available lesson plans and assignments that can be accessed from home, on the Internet:

Before the snow fell, teachers were prepped, parents were warned and students had received enough assignments to fill a snow day.

These Districts make education-related emergencies easier on all stakeholders by using tools that are simple to roll out and intuitive to use — in some cases, already implemented in daily classrooms.

If your school is looking for virtual teaching tools, you’ll want to consider two options: 1) a virtual meeting room that closely replicates the traditional class where students see both teacher and classmates and have access to whatever is normally shown on the class screen; and/or 2) virtual access to lesson plans, resources, assessments, and chats usually available in a schoolroom.

Here are seven options that satisfy these requirements. The first four are virtual meeting programs while the last three are robust Learning Management Systems that include everything required to run an online class:

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Categories: online education, Reviews | Tags: ,

9 Touch Typing Programmes for Schools

One of the favorite topics on my blog is anything about keyboarding. Every time teachers think it’s been replaced by finger swiping or audio, it comes back full-steam as the obvious solution to coding or collaborative writing. I received this thoughtful article from Ask a Tech Teacher contributor, Rohan, chockablock filled of information on how to evaluate a typing program for your students and which of the many meet the grade:

***

Touch Typing software in the American market provides you with a huge amount of choice. This is not surprising as the US embraced Touch Typing as part of their educational system many years ago and is a mandated part of learning.

This has also led to high prices because it is something that schools have to have manufacturers of these products can effectively charge higher fees.

Now obviously when we as the consumer look to purchase something being a car or a chocolate bar price is not our only consideration. We have a great deal of choice and as great as it is to have many choices it also leads us to that dilemma of which one should I choose and how do I know I made the right choice.

Which factors do we place the most importance on and ultimately which product do we choose.

Do we go with the product we have used before because we know how to use it?

Do we choose solely on price and end up with “free” as that is obviously the best price? However, if it doesn’t perform or has negative features like adds, is it really free or is there a hidden cost?

Do we choose the programme our friends use because they said it was good and then we effectively didn’t have to make a choice therefore ruling out the possibility of choosing badly? At least we can blame someone else if it wasn’t the right choice.

Do we choose something based on aesthetics? Hey at least it looks good.

In reality we have to make a decision based on a number of these factors. The result of this is we need to rank all these programmes based on these criteria and also place importance on each.

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Categories: Keyboarding | Tags:

Hour of Code: How Students Can Build Their Own Apps

In my high school teacher forums, as part of the discussion on preparing kids for college and career, we talk a lot about the huge shortfall in applicants for a growing list of tech jobs. Despite robust pay, excellent work conditions, and the value they place on creativity, jobs sit open. How do we get kids excited about careers that traditionally sound boring and math-oriented? Websites like Code.org have a great approach to making coding accessible to all kids but still, too few students think they are smart enough to do these jobs.

Time to reveal a secret I learned over the years. When I let students play Minecraft, Scratch, or a handful of other top-notch games, they eagerly — even happily — complete the programming and coding parts without ever considering it “math” or “smart”. I’ve seen them spend hours building a virtual world exactly the way they want it without getting bored or distracted.

By High School, the choice between college and career is foremost with life-changing consequences based on what the student decides. Often the choice depends upon the student’s goals. This topic could fill volumes but today, I want to focus on the job of building apps. App Developer is listed as number three on ThinkAdvisor’s list of the best jobs of the future, with a projected growth of 57% through 2020 (according to the BLS). There aren’t a lot of jobs where people can make money doing what they love.

Aside from future jobs, there are great reasons why even kids who want to become doctors or lawyers (or farmers) would benefit from learning the lesson of app building:

  • Apps teach real-world skills like design, marketing, video production, project management, presentation skills, and special media use.
  • The app building process requires creativity, innovation, critical thinking, and problem-solving — all fundamental to success in lots of jobs.
  • Good app developers are collaborators, willing to work with others to ensure the app is accomplished on time and according to specs.
  • Good app developers are decision makers, not afraid to be risk-takers in building something no one has done before.

As I dug into the background of “app building” to prepare this article, I found that it doesn’t just refer to the little buttons you click to see about today’s weather or add numbers or find your friends (well, find their phones). App developers are the first ones who try out the latest trendy devices. Wouldn’t you love to experiment with 5G on your smartphone or play with Samsung’s foldable phone? Or how about wearable devices like the embedded chips intended to replace employee cards? An app developer used all of these before they ever went on sale. App developers can work for software companies, retailers, in healthcare, in the travel industry, for the entertainment industry, or in financial services. CNN Money has called “app developer” the best job in America.

Once you’ve explained to students what it really means to be on the cutting edge of the high-tech world, let them try one (or more) of these six great app creation tools:

  • App Inventor (from MIT)
  • Code HS (an app building curriculum)
  • Glide (how to create apps from spreadsheets)
  • MAD-learn (a beginning to end app development program for K-12)
  • Thunkable (a curriculum)
  • TinyTap (geared for teachers but fine for the right student group)

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Categories: high school, problem solving, Web 2.0 | Tags: , , ,

Did You Miss These in November?

Here are the most-read posts for the month of November:

  1. Subscriber Special: November–Discounts on Select Print Books
  2. What is Actively Learn and Why Should I Try it?
  3. Ward’s Science–So Many STEM Resources
  4. Integrate OUR Curricula into Your Kiddom Digital Platform
  5. 16 Sites, 3 Apps, 7 Projects for Thanksgiving
  6. College Credit Class in Digital Citizenship
  7. PleIQ: the interactive smart toy that fosters multiple intelligences through Augmented Reality

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Categories: teacher resources | Tags:

16 Sites, 3 Apps, 7 Projects for Thanksgiving

Need a few websites and apps to fill in sponge time? Here are Thanksgiving websites that will keep students busy and still teach them:

  1. Berenstein Bears Give Thanks (app)
  2. Canadian Thanksgiving

  3. Online/Offline Thanksgiving activities
  4. Plimoth Plantation
  5. Thanksgiving edu-websites–CybraryMan
  6. Thanksgiving Games
  7. Thanksgiving games and puzzles
  8. Thanksgiving games–Quia
  9. Thanksgiving information–history, more
  10. Thanksgiving Jigsaw
  11. Thanksgiving Jigsaw II
  12. Thanksgiving Lesson Plans
  13. Thanksgiving Tic-tac-toe
  14. Thanksgiving video–Brainpop
  15. Thanksgiving Wordsearch
  16. The First Thanksgiving

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Categories: holidays, websites | Tags:

What You Might Have Missed in October

Here are the most-read posts for the month of October:

  1. Halloween Projects, Websites, Apps, Books, and a Costume
  2. 9 Good Collections of Videos for Education
  3. Videos: Why, How, Options
  4. Digital Assistants in the Classroom
  5. Help Students Select the Right Summer School
  6. Resources for Digital Citizenship Week
  7. October is National Bullying Prevention Month
  8. October is Dyslexia Awareness Month

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Categories: blogging | Tags: ,

21 Websites and 5 Posters to Teach Mouse Skills

Mouse resource list constantly updated here

Many of my most popular articles are about mouse skills. Every year, tens of thousands of teachers visit Ask a Tech Teacher to find resources for teaching students how to use a mouse. No surprise because using a mouse correctly is one of the most important pre-keyboarding skills. Holding it is not intuitive and if learned wrong, becomes a habit that’s difficult to break.

The earlier posts are still active, but I’ve updated this resource with more websites and posters to assist in starting off your newest computer aficionados.

Mouse Skills

  1. Bees and Honey
  2. Drawing Melody–draw in many colors with the mouse and create music
  3. Hover skills–drag mouse over the happy face and see it move
  4. Left-click practice while playing the piano
  5. MiniMouse
  6. Mouse and tech basics–video
  7. Mouse practice—drag, click
  8. Mouse skills
  9. Mouse Song
  10. OwlieBoo–mouse practice
  11. Wack-a-gopher (no gophers hurt in this)

Puzzles

Kids love puzzles and they are a great way to teach drag-and-drop skills with the mouse buttons. Here are some of my favorites:1183938_stylized_mouse

  1. Digipuzzles–great puzzles for geography, nature, and holidays
  2. Jigsaw Planet–create your own picture jigsaw
  3. Jigsaw puzzles
  4. Jigzone–puzzles
  5. Jigsaw Puzzles–JS

Adults

  1. Mousing Around
  2. Skillful Senior

Posters

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Categories: 1st, Kindergarten, mouse skills | Tags: | 7 Comments

20 Back-to-School Articles

On everything from get-to-know-you activities to getting yourself ready:

  1. 11+ Back-to-School Night Tips
  2. 11 Back-to-school Activities for the First Month of School
  3. Great Back to School Classroom Activities
  4. Back to School Bundle of Lesson Plans at a Great Price
  5. Plan a Memorable Back to School Night
  6. New School Year? New Tech? I Got You Covered
  7. 5 Top Ways to Integrate Technology into the New School Year
  8. 5 Ways to Involve Parents in Your Class
  9. 3 Organizational Apps to Start the School Year
  10. 6 Tech Best Practices for New Teachers
  11. How to Prepare Students for PARCC Tests
  12. 8 Tech Tools to Get to Know Your Students for Back to School
  13. 5 Tools To Shake up the New Year
  14. 3 Apps to Help Brainstorm Next Year’s Lessons
  15. What Digital Device Should My School Buy?
  16. 4 Options for a Class Internet Start Page
  17. 5 Ways Teachers Can Stay on Top of Technology
  18. Back to School–Tech Makes it Easy to Stay On Top of Everything
  19. Dear Otto: I need year-long assessments
  20. 5 Tech Ed Tools to Use this Fall

For the entire list, click this Back-to-School category tag.

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Categories: teacher resources | Tags: ,

What You Might Have Missed in July

Here are the most-read posts for the month of July:

  1. Great App for Future Readers: Word Zoo
  2.  Math Webtools to Support Any Curriculum
  3. How to Help Students Find Their Passion
  4. Wonder Workshop’s Amazing Dash
  5. How Tech Enhances Class Performance
  6. How to Do Student-led Conferences
  7. 5 digital tools to enhance the writing skills of your students
  8. 11+ Back-to-School Night Tips

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Categories: teacher resources | Tags: ,

What You Might Have Missed in June

Here are the most-read posts for the month of June:

  1. 4 Innovative Ways to Co-Author a Book
  2. What’s Changed in Lesson Planning
  3.  What’s all the buzz about Messenger Kids?
  4. 7 Tech Tools for PE Teachers
  5. Smartphones in the classroom
  6. 11 Bits of Wisdom I Learned From a Computer
  7. Digital Citizenship Curriculum
  8. 10 Books You’ll Want to Read This Summer
  9. Looking for Trusted Advisers? Look No Further
  10. Tech Ed Resources–Mentoring and Online Classes
  11. 5 Favorite Apps for Summer Learning

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Categories: teacher resources | Tags:

7 Tech Tools for PE Teachers

pe classTechnology is a natural education fit in everything from math to Spanish to literacy. The one corner of K-12 learning that is not so obvious is PE — Physical Education. In that class, we think of physical stuff — not digital — like running and exercising.

But kids love technology’s apps and software. Is there a way to use these to encourage physical fitness? After all, the tie-in between physical conditioning and learning is well-accepted. Here’s what the NY Times reports:

Better fitness proved to be linked to significantly higher achievement scores — a 2013 study reported in PubMed.org.

But, how can teachers use the technology students love to encourage physical education? Here are my favorite websites and apps:

AnatomyYou

iOS, Android

Freemium

This is a stunningly visual app that takes students right into the human body via virtual reality. Viewers travel down the gastrointestinal tract, the small intestine, the circulatory system, and three other systems. With 360-degree navigation, it is fully interactive, including even tags for important parts. Students can stop and observe while exploring the hotspots. Watch this video—you really won’t believe it.

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Categories: Health, high school, Web 2.0 | Tags:

Looking for Trusted Advisers? Look No Further

Summer is the push-pull of regeneration and rejuvenation: Should I spend my summer weeks learning my craft or relaxing? Me, I have no regular winner but the more convenient learning is, the more likely I’ll squeeze a  goodly quantity of learning into my vacation that serves me in the long run. Where years ago, that used to be attending a conference at an out-of-town hotel that required traveling expenses, now, I’m more likely to pick online classes. In fact, I’ve talked about these choices in other posts. Today, I want to talk about podcasts, webinars, and screencasts of knowledgeable educators who quickly can become your trusted advisors on a wide variety of education topics.

Here are my favorites:

alice keelerAlice Keeler

Blog: Teacher Tech with Alice Keeler

Books: Get Started with Google Classroom, Ditch That Homework, and more

Training: Go Slow Online Workshops, CoffeeEdu, and more

Social Media: @alicekeeler, YouTube

Alice Keeler is a Google Certified Teacher, New Media Consortium K12 Ambassador, Microsoft Innovative Educator and LEC Admin & Online and Blended certified. Professor of Curriculum, Instruction and Technology at California State University Fresno and Teacher on Special Assignment at ACEL Charter High school. She has developed and taught online K12 courses as well as the Innovative Educator Advanced Studies Certificate (cue.org/ieasc). Her goal: to inspire and help teachers to try something new. With a boatload of accolades, certifications, and followers, she is often a keynote or presenter at ISTE and CUE conferences and is the number one choice for those interested in anything Google.

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Categories: teacher resources | Tags:

5 Favorite Apps for Summer Learning

summer learningSummer has a reputation for being nonstop relaxation, never-ending play, and a time when students stay as far from “learning” as they can get. For educators, those long empty weeks result in a phenomenon known as “Summer Slide” — where students start the next academic year behind where they ended the last.

“…on average, students’ achievement scores declined over summer vacation by one month’s worth of school-year learning…” (Brookings)

This doesn’t have to happen. Think about what students don’t like about school. Often, it revolves around repetitive schedules, assigned grades, and/or being forced to take subjects they don’t enjoy. In summer, we can meet students where they want to learn with topics they like by offering a menu of ungraded activities that are self-paced, exciting, energizing, and nothing like school learning. We talk about life-long learners (see my article on life-long learners). This summer, model it by offering educational activities students will choose over watching TV, playing video games, or whatever else they fall into when there’s nothing to do.

Here are favorites that my students love:

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Categories: Reviews, Web 2.0 | Tags: , ,

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