Posts Tagged With: third grade

Book Review: 55 Tech Projects for the Digital Classroom

LESSON PLANSWith the school year on its way back, I want to share some of the tech books I use in my classroom. I think you’ll enjoy them also. This one is a two-volume all-in-one for grades K-8. It includes a mixture of lessons that cover different skills, different subjects. Hope you like it!

55 Technology Projects for the Digital Classroom: Everything you need to integrate computers into K-8 classes

by Jacqui Murray

Volume I is 219 pages and Volume II 235 pages, making this series an all-in-one K-8 toolkit for the lab specialist, classroom teacher and homeschooler, with a years-worth of simple-to-follow projects for K-8. Integrate technology into language arts, geography, history, problem solving, research skills, and science lesson plans and units of inquiry using teacher resources that meet NETS-S national guidelines and many state standards. The fifty-five projects are categorized by subject, program (software), and skill (grade) level. Each project includes standards met in three areas (higher-order thinking, technology-specific, and NETS-S), software required, time involved, suggested experience level, subject area supported, tech jargon, step-by-step lessons, extensions for deeper exploration, troubleshooting tips and project examples including reproducibles. Tech programs used are KidPix, all MS productivity software, Google Earth, typing software and online sites, email, Web 2.0 tools (blogs, wikis, internet start pages, social bookmarking and photo storage), Photoshop and Celestia. Also included is an Appendix of over 200 age-appropriate child-friendly websites. Skills taught include collaboration, communication, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, creativity, digital citizenship, information fluency, presentation, and technology concepts. In short, it’s everything you’d need to successfully integrate technology into the twenty-first century classroom.

Included are links to free versions of software so users aren’t forced to purchase expensive software and many how-to’s on timely technology topics like when to start keyboarding, how to integrate Web 2.0 tools into classrooms and more. The ebook is also connected to this Ask a Tech Teacher blog so users can stay up-to-date on tech in their classes and can get immediate assistance with lessons should they get stuck.

Disclaimer: I am the author of this two-volume series.

DIGITAL DELIVERY


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing TeachersCisco guest blogger, a columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer. Contact Jacqui at her writing office or her tech lab, Ask a Tech Teacher.

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Categories: Book reviews, K-5 Tech training, lesson plans, teacher resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tech Tip #56: Force a New Page

tech tipsAs a working technology teacher, I get hundreds of questions from parents about their home computers, how to do stuff, how to solve problems. Each Tuesday, I’ll share one of those with you. They’re always brief and always focused. Enjoy!

Q: I’m teaching my students to create a book report with a cover page. what’s the easiest way to get the cover on the first page and the report on the second?

A: Students as young as 2nd grade can learn to force a new page with Ctrl+enter. I have them create the cover page during one class and add the Ctrl+enter for the new page. That way, students can type the book report without my help–even on  classroom computers.

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Categories: fifth grade, fourth grade, homeschool, keyboard shortcuts, second grade, Tech Tips, Word Processing | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How to Teach 3rd Graders About Digital Citizenship

Big Ideadigital citizenship

It is important to be a good digital citizen

Time Required

8 lessons, 45 minutes per lesson

Essential Questions

  • What should you do if you meet a cyberbully?
  • How is ‘netiquette’ the same/different than etiquette?
  • Why is it wrong to ‘plagiarize’ intellectual property?
  • Why is an avatar a good idea?
  • Is the internet a safe neighborhood?

Assessment Strategies

  • Observation—students use the skills learned
  • Completion of projects
  • Transfer—evidence of student learning in classes/life
  • Emailed quiz
  • Track topics covered with graphic organizer at the end of 6-8th Grade unit
    • Receipt of certificate in Welcome to the Web unit
    • Option: certificate in Common Sense’s Digital Passport  covering:
      • Multi-tasking with cell phones is a bad idea
      • Online messaging?
      • Cyberbullying
      • Effective searches
      • Digital laws with personal creative pieces.
  • Option: Play Carnegie Cadets covering the internet, email, cyber threats, cybercrimes, chat rooms, instant messaging, netiquette, cyberbullying, online data, searching the internet, copyrights/plagiarism, cell phones, and online reputation.

More Information:

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Categories: third grade | Tags: , | 5 Comments

How to Teach Digital Citizenship in 3rd Grade

digital citizenship

How can I teach my students about digital citizenship

Understanding how to use the internet has become a cornerstone issue for students. No longer do they complete their research on projects solely in the library. Now, there is a vast landscape of resources available on the internet.

But with wealth comes responsibility. As soon as children begin to visit the online world, they need the knowledge to do that safely, securely, responsibly. There are several great programs available to guide students through this process (Common Sense’s Digital Passport, Carnegie CyberAcademy, Netsmart Kids). I’ve collected them as resources and developed a path to follow that includes the best of everything.

Here’s Third Grade:

Overview/Big Ideas

Why is it important to be a good digital citizen? How can students do this?

Essential Questions

  • What is a ‘digital citizen’?
  • What are my rights and responsibilities as Digital Citizens?
  • How is being a citizen of the internet the same/different than my home town?
  • What are the implications of digital citizenship in today’s world?

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Categories: internet, tech security, third grade, web | Tags: , | Leave a comment

When is Typing Faster Than Handwriting?

Most elementary-age students struggle with typing. This doesn’t surprise me. They’ve been handwriting since kindergarten. They’re proud of their new cursive skills. It’s easy to grab and pencil and write. Typing, though requires setting up their posture, hand position, trying to remember where all those pesky keys are (why aren’t they just alphabetized? It’s a good point. Discuss that with students).

In third grade, I gather the students and we chat about it. Why do they have to learn to keyboard? It’s more than a skill they trot out for the keyboarding software and then forget. Discuss the idea of sharing ideas–the Gutenberg Press, when writing began with scrolls and rocks, why was it important to save ideas in perpetuity? Why is it important to students?

The discussion should come around to the idea that putting ideas in some sort of permanent fashion is important to the history of mankind. The question is how, and the ‘how’ that’s relevant to the students is a comparison of handwriting and keyboarding. Here’s where we go from there:

scientific method

Circle back on science in technology

  • Discuss whether students handwrite faster/slower than they type. Ask students to share thoughts on why their opinion is true. You are likely to get opinions on both sides of this discussion. If not, prod students with logic for both.
  • When it’s clear the class is divided on this subject (or not–that’s fine too), suggest running an experiment to see which is faster—handwriting or typing.
  • Circle back to science class and engage in a discussion on the Scientific Method. Develop a hypothesis for this class research, something like: Third grade students in Mr. X’s class can handwrite faster than they type (this is the most common opinion in my classes).
  • Have students hand-copy the typing quiz they took earlier in the trimester for 3 minutes.
  • Analyze the results: Compare their handwriting speed to their typing speed. I encourage an individual comparison as well as a class average comparison to help with understanding the conclusion.
  • Discuss results: Why do students think some students typed faster and others typed slower?  (In my classes, third graders typed approx. 10 wpm and handwrote approx. 15 wpm. Discussion was heated and enthusiastic on reasons. Especially valuable were the thoughts of those rare students who typed faster).
  • Students will offer lots of reasons for slower typing (they’re new to typing, don’t do it much in class, their hands got off on the keyboard). In truth, the logistics of typing make it the hands-down winner once key placement is secured. Fingers on a keyboard are significantly faster than the moving pencil.
  • One reason students suggest is that they don’t usually type from copy. Key in on this reason (quite valid, I think—don’t you?) and revise the experiment to have students type and handwrite from a prompt.
  • What is the final conclusion?
  • If possible, share results from 4-8th. What grade level do students consistently type faster than they handwrite? Why? Are students surprised by the answer?
  • Post a list on the wall of students who type faster than they handwrite. This surprises everyone.

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Categories: critical thinking, Keyboarding | Tags: , , | 6 Comments

Book Review: 55 Tech Projects for the Digital Classroom

55 Technology Projects for the Digital Classroom: Everything you need to integrate computers into K-8 classesWith the school year almost back, I want to share some of the tech books I use in my classroom. I think you’ll enjoy them also. This one is a two-volume all-in-one for grades K-8. It includes a mixture of lessons that cover different skills, different subjects. Hope you like it!

55 Technology Projects for the Digital Classroom: Everything you need to integrate computers into K-8 classes

by Jacqui Murray

Volume I is 219 pages and Volume II 235 pages, making this series an all-in-one K-8 toolkit for the lab specialist, classroom teacher and homeschooler, with a years-worth of simple-to-follow projects for K-8. Integrate technology into language arts, geography, history, problem solving, research skills, and science lesson plans and units of inquiry using teacher resources that meet NETS-S national guidelines and many state standards. The fifty-five projects are categorized by subject, program (software), and skill (grade) level. Each project includes standards met in three areas (higher-order thinking, technology-specific, and NETS-S), software required, time involved, suggested experience level, subject area supported, tech jargon, step-by-step lessons, extensions for deeper exploration, troubleshooting tips and project examples including reproducibles. Tech programs used are KidPix, all MS productivity software, Google Earth, typing software and online sites, email, Web 2.0 tools (blogs, wikis, internet start pages, social bookmarking and photo storage), Photoshop and Celestia. Also included is an Appendix of over 200 age-appropriate child-friendly websites. Skills taught include collaboration, communication, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, creativity, digital citizenship, information fluency, presentation, and technology concepts. In short, it’s everything you’d need to successfully integrate technology into the twenty-first century classroom.

If you send a proof of purchase for the print textbook to the publisher at sales@structuredlearning.net, you can buy a discounted pdf of the book here. Continue reading

Categories: Book reviews, K-5 Tech training, lesson plans, teacher resources | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Book Review: Fourth Grade Technology Textbook

fourth grade technologyFourth Grade Technology: 32 Lessons Every Fourth  Grader Can Accomplish on a Computer

by Structured Learning IT Teaching Team

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’m often asked what books I’d recommend for teaching technology in the classroom. Each year about this time, I do a series of reviews on my favorite tech ed books. If you’re already looking ahead to next year’s technology curriculum and want to fix some of this year’s problems, I suggest you consider the seven-volume K-6 technology curriculum series that’s used in hundreds of school districts across the country (and a few internationally). It’s skills-based, project-based, aligned with NETS national standards and fully integratable into state core classroom standards.

The fifth in the series, the 127-page Fourth Grade Technology: 32 Lessons Any Fourth Grader Can Do (Structured Learning 2011), updated to MS Office 2007/10, available in print or digital, and perfect for Smartscreens, iPads, laptops. It includes many age-appropriate samples, reproducibles, Web 2.0 connections, thematic websites, and how-to’s. Because I edited this book, I made sure it includes pieces that I as a teacher knew to be critical to the classroom:

  • PDF version is in full color
  • PDF version has active links so you can click through to enrichments when required for student-centered learning
  • each lesson summarizes a 45-minute class period–usually 2-3 activities, arranged temporally throughout the year for ease of understanding by students. For example, a lesson is likely to include 2-3 activities from among typing practice, student presentations, project that ties into core class activity, problem-solving that assists with 1:1 initiatives
  • each lesson is aligned with NETS standards
  • each lesson includes required vocabulary
  • each lesson provides integrations to core classroom units and topics
  • each lesson includes trouble-shooting solutions to the problems most likely to come up in the classroom
  • each lesson includes enrichments for those precocious students who finish the lesson and want more
  • includes a list of websites (PDF has active links, print version goes to Ask a Tech Teacher Great Websites). Both print and PDF can access a webpage on Ask a Tech Teacher that is updated yearly with new websites by grade level and category
  • there’s a help link (to this blog) to a teacher using the curriculum who will help you through the prickly parts of a lesson plan. This is FREE–no charge.
  • Where lessons center around purchased software, the authors made an effort to offer free alternatives. For example, instead of KidPix, teachers can use TuxPaint. Instead of Type to Learn, teachers can use a list of online keyboarding websites like Dance Mat Typing and Typing Web
  • If you buy the print book, the PDF is discounted
  • includes pedagogy articles to help think through critical issues like keyboarding, use of the internet, how to use wikis in classrooms, and more
  • includes wall posters covering critical technology issues (like mouse skills)

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Categories: Book reviews, homeschool, lesson plans, third grade | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Weekend Website #93: 18 Natural Disasters Websites

credit: Hans

Natural disasters

Every Friday, I’ll send you a wonderful website (or more) that my classes and my

parents love. I think you’ll find they’ll be a favorite of your students as they are of mine.

My fourth graders just went through a unit of inquiry on natural disasters and we came up with a pretty good list of resources. I want to share them with you. Please add your own to the comment section:

  1. Avalanches
  2. Earthquake simulations
  3. Earthquakes
  4. Earthquakes for Kids
  5. Earthquakes–USGS
  6. Hurricanes
  7. Natural disaster videos
  8. Natural disasters—National Geographic
  9. Natural disasters–resources
  10. Savage Earth
  11. Storm Chasing
  12. Tornadoes
  13. Tornadoes II
  14. Tsunamis
  15. Volcano Adventure
  16. Volcano Underwater
  17. Volcano videos
  18. Volcanoes

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Categories: fourth grade, Science, teacher resources, third grade, websites | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Weekend Website #92: 43 Language Arts Websites for 3rd Grade

Every Friday, I’ll send you a wonderful website (or more) that my classes and my parents love. I think you’ll find they’ll be a favorite of your students as they are of mine.

Here’s a long list of Language Arts and Word Study websites for 3rd grade. I’m sure they’re fine for 4th and 5th, also. You decide, depending upon what your students are working on.

  1. BBC Phonics
  2. BiteSize—Reading, Writing, Grammar
  3. Blends
  4. Common/Proper Noun Basketball
  5. Contraction Games
  6. Contraction Crossword
  7. Contraction Practice
  8. Create a picture with words
  9. Feast of Homonyms
  10. Flamingo Suffixes
  11. Funny Poetry
  12. Glossary of Poetry Terms
  13. Grammar Gorillas
  14. Grammaropolis
  15. Instant Poetry—fill in the blanks
  16. Jelly Fish
  17. Katie’s Clubhouse
  18. Opposites Train Game
  19. Parts of speech poetry
  20. The Patchworker
  21. Pick a Word
  22. Plural Nouns
  23. Poetry with a Porpoise
  24. Poetry Engine
  25. Prefix Catch
  26. Prefix Match
  27. Prefix Suffix Balloon Game
  28. Punctuation and Capitalization
  29. Punctuation Games
  30. Sam’s Lab
  31. Shaped Poems–fun
  32. Short Vowels
  33. Suffix Match
  34. Synonym or Antonym?
  35. Third Grade Poems
  36. Vocabulary Flood
  37. Vocabulary Pinball
  38. Web-based Mad Libs
  39. Word Balloons
  40. Word Family Sort
  41. Word Magnets
  42. Word Play
  43. Word Pond

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Categories: language arts, third grade, websites, words | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Monday Freebies #38: Introduction to Google Earth

This year more than any before, classroom budgets have been cut making it more difficult than ever to equip the education of our children with quality teaching materials. I understand that. I teach K-8. Because of that, I’ve decided to give the lesson plans my publisher sells in the Technology Toolkit (110 Lesson Plans that I use in my classroom to integrate technology into core units of inquiry while insuring a fun, age-appropriate, developmentally-appropriate experience for students) for FREE. To be sure you don’t miss any of these:

…and start each week off with a fully-adaptable K-8 lesson that includes step-by-step directions as well as relevant ISTE national standards, tie-ins, extensions, troubleshooting and more. Eventually, you’ll get the entire Technology Toolkit book. If you can’t wait, you can purchase the curriculum here.

I love giving my material away for free. Thankfully, I have a publisher who supports that. If everyone did, we would reach true equity in international education.

Intro to Google Earth

Google Earth can be used for so many classroom activities. It is a favorite of even my kindergartners. I start by showing them how to pan in and out, drag to move the globe, change the perspective of the earth’s surface, use the built in tour or one I add on Calif. Missions or the solar system. I have fifth graders create a tour that the youngers then watch as a tie in.  I also let them type in their address and visit their home, including street view.

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Categories: first grade, free tech resources, Google Earth, Monday Freebies, second grade | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

Monday Freebies #37: Use Oregon Trail to Teach Westward Expansion

This year more than any before, classroom budgets have been cut making it more difficult than ever to equip the education of our children with quality teaching materials. I understand that. I teach K-8. Because of that, I’ve decided to give the lesson plans my publisher sells in the Technology Toolkit (110 Lesson Plans that I use in my classroom to integrate technology into core units of inquiry while insuring a fun, age-appropriate, developmentally-appropriate experience for students) for FREE. To be sure you don’t miss any of these:

…and start each week off with a fully-adaptable K-8 lesson that includes step-by-step directions as well as relevant ISTE national standards, tie-ins, extensions, troubleshooting and more. Eventually, you’ll get the entire Technology Toolkit book. If you can’t wait, you can purchase the curriculum here.

I love giving my material away for free. Thankfully, I have a publisher who supports that. If everyone did, we would reach true equity in international education.

Oregon Trail to Teach Problem Solving Skills

Show students how to get the most out of Oregon trail by reading the headings on each screen, thinking about problem solving skills and applying the simulation to their classroom discussion on westward expansion. I include a worksheet of questions they can answer as well as additional websites to extend their education.

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Categories: critical thinking, fourth grade, lesson plans, Monday Freebies, third grade | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Monday Freebie: #33: Grow Your Story

This year more than any before, classroom budgets have been cut making it more difficult than ever to equip the education of our children with quality teaching materials. I understand that. I teach K-8. Because of that, I’ve decided to give the lesson plans my publisher sells in the Technology Toolkit (110 Lesson Plans that I use in my classroom to integrate technology into core units of inquiry while insuring a fun, age-appropriate, developmentally-appropriate experience for students) for FREE. To be sure you don’t miss any of these:

…and start each week off with a fully-adaptable K-8 lesson that includes step-by-step directions as well as relevant ISTE national standards, tie-ins, extensions, troubleshooting and more. Eventually, you’ll get the entire Technology Toolkit book. If you can’t wait, you can purchase the curriculum here.

I love giving my material away for free. Thankfully, I have a publisher who supports that. If everyone did, we would reach true equity in international education.

Grow Your Story

Use a first-grade or second-grade story. Show students how to add description to it, setting details, sensory details, characterization, so it sounds more mature and interesting. I use thought bubbles to make it more fun.

Click on them for a full size alternative. Continue reading

Categories: lesson plans, Monday Freebies, Uncategorized | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Weekend Website #68: Live Like Bear Grylls

Every Friday I’ll send you a wonderful website that my classes and my parents love. I think you’ll find they’ll be a favorite of your students as they are of mine.

credit: Hans

What would Bear do?

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Categories: Geography, Science, websites | Tags: , , | 3 Comments

Weekend Website #66: What’s Your Carbon Footprint

Every Friday I’ll send you a wonderful website that my classes and my parents love. I think you’ll find they’ll be a favorite of your students as they are of mine.

Continue reading

Categories: Science, teacher resources, websites | Tags: , , | 3 Comments

Weekend Website #67: 20 Websites to Learn Everything About Landforms

Every Friday I’ll send you a wonderful website that my classes and my parents love. I think you’ll find they’ll be a favorite of your students as they are of mine.

landforms/manforms spells out words

Age:

3rd grade

Topic:

Landforms

Review:

If your third grader has to write a report about landforms, try these websites:

  1. About Rivers www.42explore.com/rivers.htm
  2. Biomes/Habitats http://www.allaboutnature.com/biomes/
  3. Deserts http://www.42explore.com/deserts.htm
  4. Explore the Colorado http://www.desertusa.com/colorado/explorriver/du_explorrv.html Continue reading
Categories: fourth grade, Geography, grammar and spelling, Tech ed, third grade, websites, writing | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

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