Posts Tagged With: websites

Weekend Website: Hunger Games

hunger gamesI’d like to welcome Michelle Mano as my guest blogger today. As a former classroom teacher who understands the importance of creasting a community of 21st century learners, Michelle is a strong advocate of technology in the classroom She has a great lesson plan and activities to share with you-all today, based on The Hunger Games:

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire opened in theaters on November 22 and has taken the world by storm, already grossing almost $600 million internationally. This adaptation of the bestselling young adult series by Suzanne Collins has captivated middle and high school students with its story of a futuristic government that rules through fear, subjecting its people to a deadly annual tournament. With equal parts adventure, suspense and romance, it’s clear why this trilogy has achieved such widespread appeal.

But what about its educational potential? Is it possible to use such a popular work of fiction in the classroom to generate excitement for learning?

Teach.com and Hunger Games Lessons have recently released “Sparking Their Interest: Engaging Students with The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, an exciting guide that examines the role of popular culture in education and offers great ideas for incorporating The Hunger Games into your everyday lessons. Hunger Games Lessons was started by Tracee Orman, a high school English teacher who recognized the series educational value. Teach.com is an educational resource dedicated to discovering, discussing and encouraging great teaching around the world. They work closely with USC Rossier Online, a top-ranked teacher preparation program delivered online from the University of Southern California, to foster innovation and creativity in teachers. Both share a vision of empowering educators to prepare students for 21st century learning, particularly when it comes to getting young students excited about school. According to the Hunger Games guide, “keeping your curriculum relevant is the key to student motivation…when placed in the context of 21st century skills, utilizing popular movies, television and literature allows students to become technologically adept, culturally aware and motivated to learn.”

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Categories: Guest post, high school, middle school technology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Weekend Website 40: NORAD Santa

It’s the time of year when inquiring young minds want to know–Where’s Santa? Here’s a great website to answer that question.

santa site

Track Santa on Xmas Eve

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Categories: first grade, Kindergarten, Parent resources, second grade, third grade, Uncategorized, websites | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

20 Programming Websites for K-8

December 9-15, Computer Science Education will host the Hour Of Code–a one hour introduction to students on coding, programming, and why they should love it. It’s a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code” and show that anyone can learn the basics to be a maker, a creator, an innovator. They’ll include a variety of self-guided tutorials that anybody can do, on a browser, tablet, or smartphone. No experience needed. Watch this “how to” video for more information.

In honor of the upcoming Hour of Code, here are a list of websites to practice everything from basics to advanced:

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Categories: critical thinking, websites | Tags: , , | 51 Comments

28 Halloween Sites for your Students

Here’s a short list of fun Halloween websites for your students. Enjoy!ascii art

  1. Ben & Jerry
  2. Billy Bear’s
  3. Carving Pumpkins
  4. DigCit and Halloween–video
  5. Enchanted Learning
  6. Funschool
  7. Halloween videos–nicely done
  8. Meddybemps Spooky
  9. Pumpkin Toss
  10. Save Ed
  11. Signing Halloween–a video
  12. Skelton Park
  13. The Kidz Page

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Dear Otto: What about blogging?

tech questions

Do you have a tech question?

Dear Otto is an occasional column where I answer questions I get from readers about teaching tech. If you have a question, please complete the form below and I’ll answer it here. For your privacy, I use only first names.

Here’s a great question I got from Charlie:

Jacqui, I’m curious about one aspect of blogging with students as a computer lab teacher. That aspect is efficiently managing so many students blogs. I teach grades 2 and 3 which adds up to over 600 students in 25 classes. When you only see each class once per week, blogging could easily be the basis of the entire year’s curriculum. We are a GAFE district but Blogger is blocked. For that reason and ease of management I decided upon Kidblog. So, I am curious how you manage the different classes and numbers of students as a lab teacher. Do you for example have the “all posts must be approved before going live” turned on? What is your username/password convention? Do you use the invitation method of registering student accounts or bulk upload? BTW, do you have a reference that you utilize/like in terms of the teaching progression for teaching blogging?

Hi Charlie

Truth, I don’t break my students into classes. I want them to be a community, to interact with all students. I ask students to organize posts by tags so they can quickly find other posts on a like topic.

But, I understand with 600 students, that probably won’t work as nicely as my 150 students do (4th/5th graders who I also see once a week). Kidblog allows you to set up multiple classes under your teacher log-in, then add students to each. That would break them into a tighter community for you.

I do approve all posts before publishing, as well as comments. It doesn’t take as long as it sounds like it should (though, again, I have less students blogging than you). I added all grade-level teachers as Admins on the blog and collaborated with them to review-approve posts/comments relevant to their inquiry. This worked well as teachers started using the blog posts/comments as formative assessments, assigning topics that dealt with their inquiry.

UN/PW–I keep those simple, especially important with youngers. Since I’m approving posts/comments, there isn’t a high risk that a student will hack a classmate’s account. If they do, I’ll know who did it. Yes, there are clever ways around that, but most 2/3 graders aren’t that savvy. Once the student successfully logs on, they can change their password. I allow that, but let them know it’s their responsibility to remember. They track the myriad PWs in binders. If they forget their PW (which they will), Admin members can reset, which would be you or any of the teachers you added to the list.

I do the bulk upload to get students started. No special reason, though. I am always looking for opportunities to put tech in front of students, so the invitation would work for that also. My 5th graders are on wikis and I often invite them to join (especially when they can’t find that pesky ‘join’ button!).

I use blogging as an educational tech tool, not so much a skill. I show (demonstrate rather than teach) students the log-in, layout, how to add text, media, but let them do a lot of independent discovery on the richness of the platform. I post articles on my blog that, say, include YouTube videos and hope that inspires them to ask, How did you do that?. I use blogging for many Common Core standards–publishing, sharing, collaborating, understand the perspective of others, visual learning, demonstrate independence, respond to the varying demands of audience/task/purpose/discipline, comprehend as well as critique (via comments). It truly is one of those tools that fits throughout the curriculum.

Here are a few more ideas:

How do you-all manage blogging in your classrooms?

To ask Otto a question, email me at askatechteacher@gmail.com



Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing Teachersa columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer.

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Categories: Ask Otto, Web 2.0, writing | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

9 Kids News Websites

Here’s a list of student-oriented news websites to get students interested in current events:education

  1. BBC News for kids
  2. BBC News—Day in Pictures
  3. CNN Student News
  4. Gogo News
  5. Kids News – Current Events
  6. Newspaper for Kids
  7. TeachingKidsNews
  8. Youngzine
  9. Yummy Math—math news

I update it every few months here.

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Categories: news, websites | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Weekend Website #119: 4 Great Website to Teach Letters

teddy bear lettersHelping munchkins learn their letters is one of the most frustrating–and rewarding–tasks in Kindergarten. Te ability to decode words leads to the vastness of the universe available through reading. If you’ve every met someone who can’t read, you know first hand the pain and embarrassment that dogs them every day in a world where literacy is expected not exceptional.
Anything to make this process fun is a good thing. Here’s a great list of websites that do just that. Students can see the letters, trace them on the screen with their fingers, play games with them, and suddenly find A to Z as comfortable as their favorite teddy bear.
Categories: Kindergarten, Reading, websites | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Dear Otto: What’s a typical lesson

tech questions

Do you have a tech question?

Dear Otto is an occasional column where I answer questions I get from readers about teaching tech. If you have a question, please complete the form below and I’ll answer it here. For your privacy, I use only first names.

Here’s a great question I got from Lisa:

Hi there! Wondering what your typical classroom stucture is like. For example, I will be teaching k-5 in 50 minute classes.

Hi Lisa–I just did a webinar on that topic over at CSG so I’ve put a lot of thought into this. When I teach tech, I want students to be as independent as possible, have fun, and not be intimidated. Here’s how I accomplish that:
I break it into 2-3 pieces. I start with a warm-up, ala Responsive Classroom (if you’re familiar with that). It can be keyboarding, a quick student presentation. Something like that. Then, I do the primary goal of the lesson–a tie in with classroom inquiry, skills training. I wind down with free time on inquiry-based websites I make available on the class start page. Students can pick one of their choice from a list.
A couple of bullet items you want to be sure to cover in your lessons:
  • Differentiate for learners. Show multiple ways to an end so everyone gets it.
  • Maintain order–no walking around the classroom. No changing stations because ‘my computer doesn’t work’. No going across the room to get help from a best friend. Stay in seats. Figure out how to solve a tech problem. Get help from a neighbor.
  • Rules–collect rules from students at the start of the year and follow them.
  • Clean up before they leave–get students used to leaving their stations as they found them.
  • Have enrichment available—websites, keyboarding, other. Students don’t always finish at the same time. Have enrichment websites available on the class internet start page so they can quickly move on to those. They can even be games and simulations that tie in with inquiry.
  • What to do when it all falls apart (equipment doesn’t work, network is down)—embrace problems. Pause, get student thoughts on fixing things. Be flexible. The goal of technology is critical thinking, problem solving. That is never more evident than when ‘Things Fall Apart’.
  • Keep lessons as independent as possible so students can move forward with as little assistance
    • teach them to be problem solvers
    • keep a To Do list either on the Smartscreen or the class internet start page

Every lesson has three strands woven through whatever else you do:

  • Problem solving
  • Vocabulary
  • keyboarding

Even when ‘things fall apart’, you can pursue those and have a successful day.

What do you do in your tech class?

To ask Otto a question, email me at askatechteacher@gmail.com



More tips for running your tech class:

5 Free Digital Tools for the No Budget Classroom

How to set up your tech classroom

163 Websites for Teachers to Integrate Tech into Your Classroom

Dear Otto: How do I teach keyboarding in a 25-minute class?

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Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing Teachers, Cisco guest blogger, a columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer.


Categories: Ask Otto, Web 2.0 | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Dear Otto: What’s a good kids website creator?

tech questions

Do you have a tech question?

Dear Otto is an occasional column where I answer questions I get from readers about teaching tech. If you have a question, please complete the form below and I’ll answer it here. For your privacy, I use only first names.

Here’s a great question I got from Laurie:

Do you know of any websites where teachers can create a free web page for their classroom? But I’d like to have my students maintain it, so they would need accounts and then I approve and publish the material?

Hi Laurie

The easiest free answer is to use KidBlogs as a website, but they are limited because they’re sanitized for kids. Edublogs (another blog that could be used as a website) is popular, though I have never used them. I love WordPress and use one as a website. It’s very flexible. Kids could certainly maintain it. You’d have to set up a static first page, then blog posts for the information. Maybe not as good as Google Sites or Wix or Weebly.

More of a traditional website is Wix and Weebly–both nice. They are fairly intuitive (my 4th graders used them), but they aren’t geared for kids so the free pictures are all ages. I didn’t see any bad ones (and I was looking), but their purpose isn’t to be G. For teacher use, I think you’d love Wix. There are some beautiful templates. There’s also Google Sites (comes with Google Apps for Ed–not to be confused with Blogger)

Any of these, kids could maintain. It’s simpler to have multiple users with blogs because you make them contributors with appropriate privileges, but websites are close to being as simple.

To ask Otto a question, fill out the form below:



Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing Teachers, Cisco guest blogger, a columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer.

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Categories: Ask Otto, Web 2.0 | Tags: | Leave a comment

Weekend Website #117: Co-Teaching Wikis

teach techLast chance to join the co-teaching wikis. By the end of this month, they will be private, unviewable without a membership. Drop over and check them out:

With Teaching Wikis (K-5 only), you follow along as a tech professional teaches each lesson in the SL K-5 curriculum textbooks.  Presented in a comfortable wiki format, you can ask questions as the lesson is presented, start a discussion with other teachers using the curriculum, access additional resources. It’s your mentor, your sidekick, your best friend in the tech ed field.

If you own any or all of K-5 Structured Learning technology curriculum (5th edition), you have free access to the grade-level teaching wikis. Just look on the front page of the book for a code. If you don’t own the curriculum, you can purchase access on a yearly basis here.

Questions? Contact me at askatechteacher@gmail.com

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Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing Teachers, Cisco guest blogger, a columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer.

Categories: free tech resources, social networks, teacher resources | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Weekend Website: Great (Free) Training Videos

Every week, I share a website that inspired my students. Here’s one that I’ve found effective online tech training.

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Categories: first grade, Kindergarten, Parent resources, second grade, third grade, Uncategorized, websites | Tags: | 2 Comments

34 Categories–Over 500 Links–of K-8 Links for Your Classes

digital toolsI’ve spent a good chunk of time this summer updating my link collections so they are easier to wander through and reflect more topics you’re interested in. Here are 34 categories. K-MS are also subdivided by topics with age-appropriate links. The themed categories mix all ages together. I’m not sure which is better. It’s awfully difficult to differentiate by age considering the varied skill levels of students. Please forgive me if the grade-level categories don’t always hit the mark for you!

Remember: Any time students visit the internet, remind them of their rights and responsibilities, and the obligation to be good digital citizens.

Enjoy!

Kindergarten

1stGrade

2ndGrade

3rd Grade

4th Grade

5th Grade

Middle School

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Animals

Art

Collections

Digital Citizenship

GIF’s (animated images)

Holidays

Human Body

Images

Keyboarding

Math

Mouse Skills

Music

News

Poetry

Programming

Publishing

Reading

Research

Science

Simulations

Special Needs

Study Guides

Stories

Virtual Tours

Visual Learning

Word Study

Writing

Categories: classroom management, free tech resources | Tags: , | 1 Comment

93 First Grade Websites That Tie into Classroom Lessons

1st gradeThese are my 93 favorite first grade websites. I sprinkle them in throughout the year, adding several each week to the class internet start page, deleting others. I make sure I have 3-4 each week that integrate with classroom lesson plans, 3-4 that deal with technology skills and a few that simply excite students about tech.

Here’s the list:

  1. Aesop Fables—no ads
  2. Aesop’s Fables–audio and visual
  3. Alphabetic order
  4. Animal Games
  5. Animal Games II
  6. Animal homes
  7. Animal Homes II
  8. Audio stories—read by actors
  9. Audio stories—speakaboos
  10. Brown Bear Typing 
  11. Build a Neighborhood
  12. Build with Legos
  13. Childhood Stories
  14. Children’s Stories–MagicKey
  15. Classic Fairy Tales
  16. Clifford
  17. Clocks
  18. Clocks II
  19. Color US Symbols
  20. Comic Builder
  21. Create a story
  22. Dino Fossils then and now
  23. Eco-friendly house
  24. Edugames at PBS
  25. Edugames from BBC
  26. EekoWorld
  27. Egyptian Madlibs
  28. Fairy Tales
  29. Fairy Tales and Fables
  30. Fairy Tales–signed
  31. Forest—Walk Through a Forest
  32. Games that make you think
  33. Garfield Internet Cyberbullying
  34. Geography—find msg around the world
  35. Great Websites—can’t get thru all
  36. Greece-Rome—Winged Sandals
  37. Groundhog Day Games
  38. Groundhog Day Video
  39. Hangman
  40. Holiday Elf Games
  41. Holiday hangman
  42. Holiday Hangman II
  43. Holiday—Design a Gingerbread House
  44. Holiday—match game
  45. Holiday—Math Facts
  46. Holiday—Math Facts
  47. Holiday—North Pole Academy
  48. Holiday—North Pole Academy
  49. Home of the Future
  50. Interactive storybook collection
  51. Internet safety–read-to-you book
  52. Kerpoof
  53. Keyboarding—Hyper Spider Typing
  54. Language—parts of speech
  55. Learn to Type—Big Brown Bear
  56. Listen/read–Free non-fic audio books
  57. Magic Schoolbus
  58. Make a Face
  59. Make another story
  60. Make Believe Comix
  61. Make your own Story
  62. Math Games
  63. Mighty Book
  64. Money flashcards
  65. Money—counting
  66. Mouse Click Skills—gorgeous
  67. Mouse skills
  68. Mr. Picasso Head
  69. Museum of Modern Art
  70. Music with Hands
  71. Music—Quincy & Magic Instruments
  72. My Garbology
  73. Number concepts
  74. Number Order
  75. Ocean Tracks
  76. Online typing practice
  77. Pharaoh’s Tomb Game
  78. Rainforest collection
  79. Rainforest Websites Videos
  80. Rainforest—3 games
  81. Rainforest—great but a bit of reading
  82. Rainforest—Jungle Journey
  83. Reading games
  84. Science websites
  85. Starfall
  86. Stories for children
  87. Stories from PBS
  88. Stories—MeeGenius—read/to me
  89. SumDog—free reg
  90. Where is Santa?
  91. Wild on Math—simple to use
  92. Word games—k-2
  93. Writing games

Do you have any to add?

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Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor of a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum, and creator of technology training books for how to integrate technology in education. She is webmaster for six blogs, CSG Master Teacher, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing TeachersCisco guest blogger, a columnist for Examiner.com, IMS tech expert, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. Currently, she’s editing a techno-thriller that should be out to publishers next summer. Contact Jacqui at her writing office or her tech lab, Ask a Tech Teacher.

Categories: first grade | Tags: , , | 5 Comments

169 Kindergarten Websites That Tie into Classroom Inquiry

kindergarten websitesThese are my 120 favorite kindergarten websites. I sprinkle them in throughout the year, adding several each week to the class internet start page, deleting others. I make sure I have 3-4 each week that integrate with classroom inquiry, 3-4 that deal with technology skills and a few that simply excite students about tech.

Here’s the list:

  1. Aesop Fables
  2. Aesop Fables—no ads
  3. Alphabet Animals
  4. Alphabet Doors
  5. Animal Games
  6. Animal Games II
  7. Animal Homes II
  8. Audio stories
  9. Barnaby and Bellinda Bear
  10. Bembo’s Zoo
  11. Build a car
  12. Build a car–abcya
  13. Build a Neighborhood
  14. Car puzzle
  15. Clock games–many
  16. Clocks
  17. Clocks—set the time–BBC
  18. Color US Symbols
  19. Counting Money
  20. Create Music
  21. Dino collection
  22. Dino Fossils then and now
  23. Dino Games
  24. Dino Games II
  25. Dinosaurs
  26. Dinosaurs II
  27. Dinosaurs IV
  28. Dinosaurs V
  29. Dinosaurs VI
  30. Dr. Seuss
  31. Edugames at Pauly’s Playhouse
  32. Edugames—drag-and-drop puzzles
  33. Endangered species collection
  34. Fables–beautiful
  35. Find a dog
  36. Game Goo—wacky games that teach
  37. Games to teach mouse skills, problem-solving
  38. Games to teach problem-solving skills
  39. Geogreeting—find letters around the world
  40. Great Websites—can’t get thru all of them
  41. Groundhog Day
  42. Holiday Elf Games
  43. Holiday music
  44. Holiday—Design Gingerbread House
  45. Holiday—match game
  46. Holiday—North Pole Academy
  47. Holidays–various
  48. Interactive sites
  49. Kerpoof
  50. Keyboarding—Hyper Spider Typing
  51. Kindergarten Links—Science, etc.
  52. KinderSite—lots of kindergarten websites
  53. Learn to Read
  54. Learn to read—Teach your monster to read
  55. Letters—find the letter
  56. Letters—find the letter—caps and lower case
  57. Letters—sort by sounds
  58. Literacy sites
  59. Magic Keys–stories for youngers
  60. Make a Face
  61. Make a Monster
  62. Make a Scary Spud
  63. Make a Story
  64. Math for K
  65. Math Games
  66. Math/LA Videos by grade level
  67. Mighty book storybooks
  68. Mr. Picasso Head
  69. Museum of Modern Art
  70. Music—Quincy and the Magic Instruments
  71. Ocean Currents—video from NASA
  72. Ocean Safari
  73. Ocean Tracks
  74. PBS Stories–Between the Lions
  75. Puzzle
  76. Reading games
  77. Recycle—Michael Michael Go Recycle
  78. Shapes and colors
  79. Sid the Scientist
  80. Signed stories
  81. Spring Garden—click for flowers
  82. Starfall 
  83. Stories–Animated
  84. Stories—CircleTime—international
  85. Stories—MeeGenius—read/to me
  86. Stories—non-text
  87. The Learning Planet
  88. Time
  89. Time clocks
  90. Transportation alphabet
  91. Transportation games
  92. Transportation matching
  93. Transportation Sequence Games
  94. Transportation video–BrainPopJr
  95. Turkey websites
  96. Valentine Sudoku
  97. Valentine mouse skills
  98. Line up the hearts
  99. Dress up the heart
  100. Valentine unscramble
  101. Valentine typing
  102. Valentine puppy jigsaw
  103. Valentine drag-and-drop
  104. Valentine match
  105. Valentine tic-tac-toe
  106. Valentine projects from Winter Wonderland
  107. Write in a heart
  108. More heart writing
  109. ‘I love you’ in languages Afrikaans to Zulu
  110. Valentine’s Day apps
  111. Valentine Day games and stories
  112. Valentine coloring book
  113. Valentine Day poem generator
  114. Valentine rebuses
  115. Valentine rebus game
  116. Virtual Farm
  117. Virtual Zoo
  118. Word games—k-2
  119. Writing games
  120. Ziggity Zoom Stories

Technology

  1. Audio books—Ms. Noor–free
  2. Bees and Honey
  3. Clicky’s Web(safe) World
  4. Clicky’s Web(safe) World II
  5. Computer basics
  6. Computer Basics II
  7. Computer puzzle
  8. Computer safety
  9. Cyber-bullying video
  10. Day in a digital citizen’s life
  11. Disney CyberNetiquette Comix
  12. Drag and drop games–visual
  13. Drag and drop puzzles
  14. Drag and drop skills
  15. Find the Technology
  16. Garfield internet safety
  17. Internet—what is it–video
  18. Internet safety games
  19. Internet Safety Site –Disney
  20. Internet Smart Princess
  21. Jigsaw puzzles
  22. Jigzone–puzzles
  23. Keyboard Climber
  24. Keyboard Use Video
  25. Listen/read–Free non-fic audio books
  26. Monitor Use Video
  27. More Mouse Skills
  28. Mouse and tech basics–video
  29. Mouse Click Skills—gorgeous
  30. Mouse exercises–for olders too
  31. Mouse practice
  32. Mouse practice—drag, click
  33. Mouse Song
  34. Mouse Use Video
  35. Mouse—Tidy the Classroom
  36. Mouse—Wack a Gopher
  37. Mousing around
  38. My Online Neighborhood–video
  39. NetSmartKids–read-to-you–net safety
  40. Odiogo—read blog posts to students
  41. Organize technology (drag and drop)
  42. Parts of the computer
  43. Parts of the computer—BrainPopJr
  44. Princess who knew how to UYN–video
  45. Surf Swell Island
  46. Tech Training—basics
  47. Tidy the classroom
  48. Videos on Computer Basics K-6
  49. Webville Outlaws–internet safety

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Categories: first grade, free tech resources, Subjects, websites | Tags: , , , | 9 Comments

Weekend Website #133: Embeddable Puzzles

It’s the time of year when children are looking for entertainment and parents want something fun to keep their cerebral fires burning. Entertainment-cerebra–that’s not an oxymoron. Check this website on States, and then check out the other topics available on Quiz Factor.

states

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Categories: first grade, Kindergarten, Parent resources, second grade, third grade, Uncategorized, websites | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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